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the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to the rules of the house and house resolution 821, i call up h.r. 6429, the stem jobs act of 2012, as amended, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6429, a bill to amend the immigration and nationality act to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states to eliminate the diversity immigrant program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 821, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 112-34, modified by the amendment printed in house report 112-697, is adopted. the bill as amended is considered as read. the gentleman from california, mr. issa, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 45 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. issa: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
? >> you know, they definitely want him, you can see that. in fact, senator feinstein of california, who is head of the senate intelligence committee, wants him, is hoping that he would testify as early as friday. he was scheduled to testify this week. in fact, i believe it was thursday. that's not happening. but, you know, youf got two things. one is they believe that the information that he has, obviously, would be valuable. and, in fact, in some cases they would say crucial. the other thing is there are allegations by some republicans that the timing of his stepping down and all of his scandal is connected to the investigation. now that is surmisal on their part. that's allegations. there certainly is a lot of interest in getting him up there to tell what he knows. >> jill dougherty, reporting live for us this morning. >>> it has been eight months since the president has held a news conference at the white house. as you know, a lot has happened since then. attacks in benghazi, re-election, fiscal cliff we're getting very close to. white house correspondent brianna keilar joins us now.
at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern, part of a book tv's holiday >> actor and former california governor arnold schwarzenegger joins a group of executives for a discussion on hollywood impact on culture. this marked the launch of the university of southern california's new schwarzenegger institute. the discussion was moderated by ben smith. from los angeles, this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for turning up for this. it is an honor to be here. anyone who has been uncovering policy in new york kind of feels entertainment industry has this enormous power in politics and public policy, and also as a dark matter out there. we do not fully understand how it is affecting and changing what happens on the east coast. we have a remarkable panel of longtime leaders in that industry to help explain that to me and to you. one regret -- he apologizes for not being able to be here with us. he is working on the next "avatar" script. i will bring out the panel. the first person is arnold schwarzenegger. [applause] he is our host today. he is somebody who uniquely came from the
profound if you live in a glass house cast no stones. we've been joined by laura richardson from california. thank you for joining us here. this very unqualified woman of course spear headed efforts to bring the international sanctions against i ran, sanctions on -- iran, sanctions on north korea and has brought significant to bringing down kadafi. we now are going to hear from a very special colleague, terri sule from the seventh district of alabama. she has very special insight into the qualifications and integrity of susan rice. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. today i stand with my colleagues, proudly stand with my colleagues in expressing our outrage about the unfair attacks against the u.s. ambassador susan rice. these recent attacks are nothing short of offensive. nothing short of offensive. leading the charge to oppose ambassador rice are our senators who profess to want to block any potential nomination of this overly qualified public serve ant. and i for you cannot sit back like all of us and not say this is wrong. it's not only wrong, it's actually unpatriot i can. to b
. >>> a person is shot on a college campus. >> and the catch of a lifetime for a fisherman off of the california coast. >> and when will the sunshine return? we need that here. gary is back with the extended forecast. anncr: it's said that charactetr is what we do... when we think no one is looking. mitt romney: believe that they are victims. anncr: mitt romney thought no one was looking when... he attacked forty-seven percent of americans. his companies shipped jobs overseas. his plan cuts millionaires' taxes, but raises yours. he'll voucherize medicare... and make catastrophic cuts to education. so remember what romney said... and what his plan would do. president obama: i'm barack obama and... i approve this message. what mitt romney's tv ads say about women? or what mitt romney himself says? mitt romney: do i believe the supreme court... should overturn roe v. wade? yes. and it would be my preference that they, that they... reverse roe v. wade. hopefully reverse roe v. wade. overturn roe v. wade. planned parenthood, we're going to get rid of that. i'll cut off funding to planned parenthood.
. the state of california goes to the democrat, not surprisingly, obama as -- the polls have just closes in california. nothing reporting yet but we are 100% sure california goes to obama. the state of washington not surprisingly to the democrat obama. the state of idaho, goes to romney. 91 votes to 52 votes, we are sure of ourselves around here and then the state of hawaii, good evening to you and you have elected -- you have given your votes to obama. now to the important states which are still undecide. that will begin with the state of virginia. a state that we have been watching all night long. now three fourths of all precincts reporting. romney with a slight lead but still to close to call according to the decision team. the state of ohio which we thought would be the big teller of the night, obama at the moment at least has opened up a lead but only two thirds of all precincts reporting and ohio is still to close to call as is iowa, six votes up for grabs, important state in this election. obama with what looks like it's a lead but because of the precincts still out it's to close
california and new york and massachusetts said hey, you know what, we'd like to secede from the union. what would fox news have done with that? oh my god! traitors! traitors! bill o'reilly said terrorists should blow up the court tower in san francisco and they didn't even do a as he session plan. go ahead but you'll be miserable losers and failures. which states would i dump first? the takers and moochers in alabama. have at it, son see how that works out for you. you would be in epic disaster, within 10-20 years, you would be begging us, please, massachusetts, please new york, please california, please, the united states of america, take us back, we didn't mean it. it turns out we were milking you all this time and we didn't know what the hell we were doing we're grotesque failures. alabama! alabama! yeah, good luck to you. unamerican. traitors. all right. it's not the whole state. it's not the whole state. 21% of people from alabama said they were in favor of making interracial marriage illegal. when we come back, hope, meals on wheels, some people are actually trying to address poverty.
are going to be happy. some heavy snow will be falling across british columbia, california, but if you're driving across this area, denver, do slow down. some of the white stuff will be coming out of the skies across much of these areas. temperatures, winnipeg, a high of zero towards the north, chicago at 10. if we look at the east coast, a pair of 11s in new york and washington, d.c. and then into europe, also continuing to watch a storm system push onshore across portugal and spain. as this does move overhead, it is already creating some high wind and heavy waves and even heavy rain warnings in portugal, eventually into spain. then we'll watch this ininto the early part of the workweek on monday and tuesday. there could be some severe weather out there towards the central mediterranean and even towards italy. you're already seeing some rough weather due to this low-pressure area pufshing out across this yair. we see storm warnings in effect as this continues to move overhead and bringing with it heavy rain. north of it, though, look at these clear skies. one thing you are watching is
into the rockies across british columbia, even down there towards california. but if you're driving across this area, even towards denver, do slow down. some of the white stuff will be coming out of the skies across much of these areas. temperatures, winnipeg, a high of zero towards the north, chicago at 10. if we look at the east coast, a pair of 11s there in new york and washington, d.c. and then into europe, also continuing to watch a storm system push onshore across portugal and spain. as this does move overhead, it is already creating some high wind and heavy waves and even heavy rain warnings there in portugal, eventually into spain. then we'll watch this into the early part of the workweek on monday and tuesday. there could be some severe weather out there towards the central mediterranean and even over towards italy. you're already seeing some rough weather due to this low-pressure area pushing out across this area. we're seeing storm warnings in effect as this continues to move overhead and bringing with it heavy rain. north of it, though, look at these clear skies. one thing you
democratic circles, nancy pelosi has not given a hint about what is next. she has returned to california. sources close say not to expect any announcement before next week. democrats have a caucus meeting for wednesday." next is ron from taxes on the line for independent. caller: i am from kentucky. when these elected officials get elected to office, they sign a contract to the american people. they should not ever put their name on a contract to any certain group. they sign a pledge to work for all of the people, not just certain ones. i also think when the tea party got there thing go in, they do not want to come together in any kind of compromises. i just think it should be borne of a moderate thinking in congress to work towards the middle. i do not like the extremes either way. host: did the election change that attitude? do you think there will be compromise, and not the extremism on either end? caller: i hope so. from what i hear from mitch mcconnell, i do not like. i am a kentucky citizen. it is about time for him to retire. i think mr. john boehner wants to work out a deal. i re
? michele bachmann? jeb bush did not run. they got stuck with mitt romney. host: california has gone from a republican to a purple to a solid democratic state. what has changed? ronald reagan winning back in 1984. guest: i am proud to take a little bit of credit for that four at one time being the democratic party chair in california. the republican party is a mirror of the national republican party in the sense that i think they lost track of where the country was moving. republican registration in ronald reagan's day was 63.5% republican. today it is less than 30%. democrats did a good job of registering voters, but the republican party lost all of those people by their extreme right-wing philosophy and policies. host: pete wilson on the issue of immigration. why is that a mirror image? guest: we always had a hard time convincing latinos to vote, to register and to vote. we called them the sleeping giant. the sleeping giant woke up. he will send put an anti- immigration initiative on the ballot. the latino community came alive. a registered. now, they are a power in california and many
-- alex from california, a republican caller. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. i have complete trust in the fbi, cia, at home and security. i have complete trust within the confines of their agency walls. if you look at all of the botched terrorist plots that have been occurring since 9/11, it is absolutely amazing what our agencies are doing to keep us safe. who i do not trust is the white house suits who apparently put a spin on the nsa's official briefs and input on worldwide events. i believe the white house puts a political spin on everything that comes to the president, to the secretary of state. then to the american people. it was 9/11 when we had benghazi going down. that is a data i think the president would rather have nothing going down. apparently there was something going down. with petraeus, is it not ironic that he is now being the scrutinized over these extramarital affairs when he is about to testify in regards to what happened in benghazi. >>let's get a couple more comments on facebook and twitter. thank you for all of your calls. coming up next, congressman r
twitter account. first, the program from the commonwealth club in california and th. >> good evening and welcome. i am your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and invite everyone to listen to us online. and now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. mark feed man is c.e. ofmente and founder of encore.org. an organization working to promote encore careers, second acts for the greater good. he spear headed the experience corp one of the biggest service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize which annually provides five 100,000 dollar prices. >> freedman was described as the voice of aging baby boomers for who are sur suing meaningful and sustaining work for later in life. while the "wall street journal" stated he has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he's the author of "the big shift: navigating the new stage beyond midlife" published in april 2011 which "the new york times" called an imaginative work with a potential to affect our individual lives and collective future. rec
. >> could you see sunday about california? we have had a big shake-up there. >> some are republican on republican and democrat on democrat, where they are spending huge sums of money. as the chairman, it is always a tough race. that is something -- it comes late and we want to make sure we do not get our clock cleaned. i would get nervous about california. >> i always pointed out to my friends that my own state does believe in a referendum or recall. we do not have term limits. >> the redistricting commission was ok. i have become much more sympathetic to a bipartisan redistricting. even if one of those gets over 50%, the top to have to run in the general election. it makes no sense to me and the california system -- >> i like the system because it forces basically candidate to talk to everybody and not just to a narrow slice of the electorate. it makes for better governance. >> it will serve as heads of your congressional campaign committees for your respective parties and you have alluded to the way things have changed since you were running these campaign committees. the influenc
. it is incomeathome.com. incomeathome.com. out in san rafael, california, which i know very, very well. here's ken. ken, good morning. >> caller: good morning, bill. you know, i think petraeus got what he deserved. this woman is 20 years his junior. he sells the war in afghanistan to the president by undermining the president. and he followed the same processes that never work from algeria to today. it's never worked. never worked in algeria. it didn't work in vietnam or baghdad. it didn't work in kabul. he's promoted as a great general and a great man. this guy's a -- >> bill: ken wait. maybe he should have been fired because -- as you assert, if his policies are wrong then fire him because his policies are wrong. don't fire him because he cheats on his wife or he has an extramarital affair. >> caller: the point i'm making is that he is corrupt as a human being. just like the cowl mination -- the culmination of it. >> bill: i hear you. but i'm talking about on what basis do we decide someone should not be in their job.
's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow this to happen, president obama is going to put you in jail because of political dissent. there are people on my side who are afraid of law of war detention being in barack obama's hand because they think -- they hate him
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassina
up. thank you. [applause] k you very much,. . i appreciate what you are doing. in california, we have not adopted as much, doctors and twice as you have seen in washington d.c. when we introduce choice, the public schools, the bar will rise because they have to keep up with the charter schools. is that a belief you experienced in washington d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% to place? >> it makes a difference. i do not think you can have reform and education without choice. without choice, there will not be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. it is easy for people to fall into the category of, if you want change, you push for change. i support public schools. i gave teachers the largest raise they ever got, gave the schools more money than they asked for, their test scores and results went down. more money, your kids come and the task force went down. that is because it is like a blob, bureaucracy, like a vacuum cleaner that sucks away the money from the local schools and pours it into the central office. you have all of these cost c
. and could now be the state of washington. it could be california. it could be new mexico. it could be illinois. the odds are that kennedy will win. there are still some of results still to come in. if the present trend continues. senator kennedy will be the next president of the united states. >> the election may have been a close one. but i want to express and my appreciation to all of them and to mr. nixon personally. chris: finally, the return of richard nixon winning narrowly over shubte humphrey in 19 -- over hubert humphrey in 1968. >> election night 1968. nixon's the one. that's the natural banner for any sprightly front page tonight. richard nixon won the election this time. where eight years ago, he lost it. in illinois. it was so close, it took forever. but he won it. it was again one of the closest elections in american history. >> i have done my best. i have lost. mr. nixon has won. so now let's get on with the urgent task of uniting our country. thank you. [applause] >> having lost a close one eight years ago and having won a close one this year, i can say this. winnin
in the local proximity. we are now in a global marketplace. i was in california last week. we need to compete across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the nex
of mutual aid to bring in, more utility crews from surrounding areas as far south and west as california, those cruz becher drive in and get their relatively fast have driven in. but we still have crews on the west coast that have 3-5 days transit time. there is also concerned that with the fire season, if they could not get back for their fire season was that gets going, that they would not be able to send their resources. there is also aircraft. there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response. but also, understand that teams were already moving well before sandy hit. teams have been called from the midwest and south. if it makes sense that they can drive there faster than flying, then they are driving in. for those that need to, they're flying in this afternoon. >> i am wondering how the contacting process is going. some contracts are already in place. will there be proposals for other types of aid? does fema have enough money with the $3.6 billion? especially when they are only authorized for $3.8 billion. >> yes, we will
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
reagan became governor in california in 1967. the movement slowly but surely grew in popularity. and his 1980 victory. reagan converted democrats not by adopting democrat views. but instead by convincing them that conservative solutions offer the only hope for american renewal. we need to do that same thing again. and that's the memo. now on to the top story. reaction. joining me from new york. republic strategist dee dee ben can i and from nashville, tennessee, republic chip saultzman who was the manager of governor mike huckabee's 2008 presidential bid. okay. it's great to see you. we will start with you dee dee because i know you were a special assistant in the bush years. and i can see from your p.o.v. on my sheet here, you think that it was kind of the todd akin type of republic that sank this race for conservatives. is that right? >> yes, laura. i do agree with you on the point that mitt romney if he had been a little bit more passionate. it was a struggle for him to be that way and the first debate went very well but then the democrats were able to fill in and akin and mourdock an
of california. there's a lot of news out there. we have a lot to cover. first, congressman larson, about this barn storming tour that is being suggested that the president might do. will this put pressure on lawmakers? would public pressure make a difference at this point? >> well, i think it's important that the president be out there and i think it would only enhance the opportunity for us coming to solutions. when the american public wants to see is a congress working toward solutions that will put them back to work. and ed, you have emphasized this over and over again on your show. job creation equals deficit reduction. so putting -- this is something that everyone can agree on in the congress. they wouldn't even take up the president's bill. let's take up the job creation bill. let's signal to the american public and the the entire world that this nation is going back to work and we know that lowering that unemployment rate will drop the deficit and produce a better society. and also with regard to taxes. we have a clear path forward here. everybody again agrees that the middle clas
on a california freeway. what two motorists did that has people calling them heroes. we'll show you that story. >>> as rich mentioned, a favorite snack in jeopardy. your favorite snack? rick: i've been known to have a twinkie or two. jenna: now or then, right? rick: sure. who hasn't? jenna: apparently the twinkie is in jeopardy. why it could be the end of the road for twinkies next. rick: no. you can't argue with nutrition you can see. great grains. great grains cereal starts whole and stays whole. see the seam? more pcessed flakes look nothing like natural grains. i'm eating what i kn is better nutrition. mmmm. great grains. search great grains and see for yourself. or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year. time for campbell's green bean casserole. you'll find the recipe at campbellskitchen.com. ♪ campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. music: "make someone happy" music: "make someone happy" ♪it's so important to make someo
a phone call. california democrats line good evening. caller: i'm calling to say that i'm voting for obama because he has been through a whole lot for the first four years. he's trying to straighten out what the republicans has messed up. and i go with obama. host: host: thanks for call. gilbert is a long time reporter for the milwaukee tribbune. we checked in with him what he will be checking out on election night. guest: i think the turn out will be sky high. i'm going to be interested to see what the interplay is between those races or whether they're cooky cutter images because of how polarized these elections have become or whether we get an election that is much more like 2,000 and 2004 in wisconsin at the top of the ticket which was decided by less than half a percentage noint both cases or whether wisconsin is better for democrats than their national numbers which has happened on occasion. so wisconsin swings back and forth between those two patterns and those are things i'll be interested in watching on election night. host: our next call is from wisconsin on the republican line.
in southern california. >> what did haley barbour say about jim jeffords in vermont? >> again, during this presidential process when i was asking olympia snowe or asking a candidate about olympia snowe, are you glad she's in your party? he wouldn't answer. >> right. >> and then we asked haley who said, "hell, yeah. i'm glad olympia snowe is in our party and i wish jim jeffords was, too." even on his most liberal day, jim jeffords was going to get elected more than anybody in vermont. >> do you think -- what's the time frame here? is it that the republican party has perhaps a year and a half to sort of figure out what direction they're going to head in? a year and a half before the leaders of the republican party go to the front window of the club that they belong to, open up the drapes and look out on main street and see the reality of life in america today? >> this happens all the time. i mean, i remember getting elected in 1994. you know, "u.s. news & world report" had a cover talking about the end of the democratic party. you remember 1980. >> yeah, yeah. >> people were saying the
of state. the story is different in california where house democrats picked up another seat after congresswoman mary bono conceded to her challenger raul ruiz. >>> and across the country, voting rights were a concern for some, for a lot of people, actually. new laws, confusion and voting machine shortages had some wa h watchdogs crying foul. now, despite the criticisms, the supreme court will hear a challenge to the voting rights act. a law seen as the federal government's most powerful tool in protecting minority rights at the polls. the plaintiff one alabama county said the fed should not subject some states to stricter standards than others. oral arguments will be held next year with the ruling expected in june. >>> and after the one-two punch of superstorm sandy and a nor'easter, hundreds of thousands remain without power in the northeast, including an estimated 150,000 customers in three long island counties. new york governor andrew cuomo offering a stinging critique of the the utily company involved. >> we gave them a franchise because they represented themselves as expert
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
party to a degree. i admit i'm a nate tive california person and i didn't get it. ho can we have this dialogu without screaming at each other. >> c we talk to each other and not scream at one another? >> i hope so. i think when you look at our politics and look at some of the dysfunction in washington and now we have the fiscal cliff issue that is are fwfer congress and i think it's a real open question about whether we're going to have a politically induced recession. we're 40, 50 days away. you see a lot of turbulence in the markets over the next months but this is a political crisis that is going to be bring about an economic crisis if it doesn't get solved. but for the entire history of the country people do profoundly disagree with each other, have been and sometimes don't like each other very much have been able to sit across from each other and do the business of the american people. and that's what the moment requires now. on the question of screaming at each other we should understand that there are tremendous market incentives for people to go on tv and attack each othe
pad was released today as well. >>> get a load of this one. it was nearly a $23 million mistake. california woman found out she won the lottery after seeing her picture in the paper. the woman bought the lucky ticket in may and guess what, like a lot of us, she forgot she bought it and didn't check the numbers. with the clock ticking down on time, the officials released a surveillance picture of the winner buying the ticket. they knew where it was bought and when, and they were hoping to track the person down. guess what, it worked. the store where it was bought also won $115,000, their cut, and a bump in business. >> after we sold her the ticket, after we sold the jackpot, i have like my business went up and helped my business a lot. i have people come and -- all over the town. >> the winner stepped up in time and only had 25 days left until she forfeited the $23 million prize. >> can you imagine? >> no. >> if you found out afterwards? >> how would you live with yourself? you would wonder why, why. >> wow, any time i buy a lottery ticket, i will double check. >> for all of us. >> and just the nu
trucks were airlifted from california today to help restore power to the areas hit by the storm. >>> snowshoe resort in west virginia got more than 2 feet of snow before sandy moved on. today resort officials say they wished they could open for skiers this weekend, but it's too dangerous. there are widespread power outages. sandy brought 60 mile-per-hour winds to snowshoe. >>> no power, no heat, now no fuel for cars, part of the story in new jersey today. a gas shortage looms. sandy left shortages across the state. now drivers are braving long lines in hopes of fueling up. fox's robert gray reports. >> reporter: a major gasoline shortage hitting new jersey and new york as the east coast tries to get back to normal in the wake of hurricane sandy. >> last night i was in a place. i waited 45 minutes. i was about 50 feet from it. they ran out. so it's like you're not even guaranteed even if you wait in line an hour. >> reporter: and today is no better. >> we got here about 6:15, 7:30 now, about an hour and 15 minutes, figure will be at least another hour. >> reporter: lines stret
university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in government doctor solomon negotiate the cambodia peace treaty, the first united nations permanent peacemaking agreement, a leading role in a dialogue commission issues between the united states and the koreans. helped establish aipac, the asia-pacific economic cooperation initiative ambiguous negotiations, japan, mongolia and vietnam on important bilateral issues. in 1992-93, doctor solomon shoulda susan glasser to the philippines recorded the closure of the u.s. naval bases and the new framework bilateral and reg
on the ground right now? >> we're from california. we came to ohio because, you know, california is kind of a safe state, we wanted to be where the action was. and, you know, it is really important to get every single voter out there. >> reporter: alina smith is the veteran here. how long have you been doing this? >> about 50 years. >> reporter: 50 years you've been volunteering? >> yes. >> reporter: for democrats? >> yes. >> reporter: and for the president now? >> if they don't have rides, we're ready to pick them up and carry them and put them right on the spot, whatever it is. >> reporter: on the other side of town, from the other side of the aisle, another group of ladies is burning up the phone lines for governor mitt romney. for mary mogan, sometimes the calls are a success. >> can we count on your vote for mitt? yes, that's what i want to hear! thank you, ma'am, so much. >> reporter: and sometimes not so much. >> can we count on you for mitt romney? hello? i guess that's a no. >> reporter: across the table, one month call newby angie dodd she's she's said she's unemployed and she'
and massachusetts into play. democrats are trying hard to unseat gop incumbents in blue states like california, new york, and illinois. and could see gains in maryland and florida. so why do these house races matter? members of congress will have to make big decisions in the coming month. chief among them, reaching a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, a series of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect next year. >> the decisions confronting congress over the next four months are bigger than i think most of us have seen in our lifetime, at least on the fiscal matter. >> it's not just the fiscal cliff. >> most people think we need fundamental tax reform, cuts in spending and entitlement reform. there's no indication the new congress will be willing to do that either short-term in the lame duck or longer term. >> so the forecast for the next congress, more of the same. athena jones, cnn, washington. >> and we have more on the race to the white house. first lady michelle obama is expected to speak any minute now in southern ohio. you're looking at live pictures right now. looks like
. in higher third of unemployment. what else is dark? california is dark. these are safe democratic states. where is unemployment low? from north dakota down to oklahoma none of that is going for obama. only one place perhaps. virginia is a potential swing state and also wisconsin. maybe that low rate is a precondition for obama to potentially win it. let's look at the change. again, very similar. darker is less change. less improving unemployment. new york, not a good state for change of unemployment over the last year but probably safely in the obama camp. the one place you might want to look here, nevada, florida, north carolina and virginia. those are all potentially in play because they had some improvement in the unemployment rate and if that had not been there, they might have been for romney. i would like to give you a definitive answer. you have the level of unemployment and you have the change. that's what makes this a horse race, simon. >> it's fascinating to see that the way you slice and dice going into the election whether it's turnout or amazing. steve, thank you very much.
organizations. it also features the involvement of the university of california, just working with local communities to rethink and refrain perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security personnel and he would security. there are a lot of, you know, bottom-up approach is to changing the securities sector. we see some of these efforts, important efforts happening in addition to the high-level policy stuff that we have been discussing, such as the police for each ship initiative. >> thank you. i don't know. okay. let's take this as our final question. i have one more very last question to pose to our panel before we break. >> i am independent researcher and consultant. so my question is the same primarily of bob. you know, of course mentioning his paper and highlighted the problems of the challenges. the light footprint, not come so or afghanistan. thousands, if not tens of hundreds of thousands of people on the ground appeal to push the democratization and the ss are forward. so i guess my question, what our considerations are when we engage. what can we do during the conflict to
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